The Black Panther of Sivanipalli and Other Adventures of the Indian Jungle

The Black Panther of Sivanipalli and Other Adventures of the Indian Jungle is the third book of jungle tales and man-eaters written by Kenneth Anderson , first published in 1959 byGeorge Allen & Unwin Ltd .

Dedication

“To all those who love the still life of the earth – the tropical jungles, the towering mountains and rolling hills, the open skies and to all those who love peace, stillness and solitude, wild life and Nature – I dedicate this book” [1]

Contents

Introduction

Author Kenneth Anderson introduces his third book, and explains his reasons for devoting the first five chapters to panthers .

A Panther’s Way

Anderson discusses the usual differences of the panther and tiger , and the methods adopted for tracking them.

Panther of the Yellagiri Hills Man-Eating

A cattle-lifting panther turns man-eater when wounded by a local man’s gunshot, and Kenneth Anderson heads to the Yellagiri Hills to investigate. Over the course of many weeks he returns to the Yellagiri Hills and sits up on a goat and donkey baits awaiting a successful shot. We have few chances the Panther charges at Anderson

Old Munuswamy & The Panther of Magadi

A local shikari guide, Munuswamy (who earns his living by exploiting panther hunters) attempts to gain local notoriety by shooting a cattle lift panther himself. Failing to kill the animal, the panther turns to attacking humans. The local authorities find out who is responsible for wounding the panther and Munuswamy is given to the panther or face jail. Munuswamy’s friend Kenneth Anderson arrives to help, and they head to a cellar which they believe to be the panther’s home.

The Black Panther of Sivanipalli

Anderson heads to Sivanipalli on the trail of a black panther which has been killing local cattle. Locating the panther soon enough, Anderson struggles to make a clean shot in the dark to the panther ‘s fur being black. The next day Anderson follows the trail of the wounded black panther to the mouth of a cellar, but in firing a further shot to bee hive opens up and Anderson is attacked by a swarm of bees.

Snakes and Other Jungle Creatures

Anderson discusses his experiences and knowledge of various Indian wildlife, from elephants and wild boar to king cobra and Russell’s viper .

The Killer From Hyderabad

A man-eating tiger starts killing along the line in Chelama and over the course of three and a half years is responsible for over eighty human deaths. Anderson arrives on the scene and discovers a pattern in the kill sites, suggesting a four month cycle that the man-eater uses in passing through different local. Anderson finally shoots a large tiger. Anderson has said that it is the man-eater, but the locals are convinced that they are safe. The man-eater strikes again, killing the wife of a local man, Bala who had also lost his father to the same man-eater. Anderson convinces the distraught man to leave his wife’s body during the night. The only site for Anderson to sit in, is inside the hollow of an old rotten tree. When the tiger arrives Anderson is unable to gain control of the position of Bala’s wife while he tries to gain a better sight. Finally Anderson manages to get some shots off, but only manages to wound the tiger. The next day he follows the tiger’s blood trail, but when the trail runs out Anderson loses track of the wounded animal. Anderson returns home, and is still being reported in the area, and Anderson is still left wondering if it is the same tiger or not. but only manages to wound the tiger. The next day he follows the tiger’s blood trail, but when the trail runs out Anderson loses track of the wounded animal. Anderson returns home, and is still being reported in the area, and Anderson is still left wondering if it is the same tiger or not. but only manages to wound the tiger. The next day he follows the tiger’s blood trail, but when the trail runs out Anderson loses track of the wounded animal. Anderson returns home, and is still being reported in the area, and Anderson is still left wondering if it is the same tiger or not.

The Big Bull Bison of Gedesal

Anderson tells the tale of a big bull bison with a deformed, pointing inwards horn. He recounts his many encounters with the bull, ending in the scene of a huge fight the bison had with a tiger.

The Maned Tiger of Chordi

A tiger with an outstanding ruff of hair around his neck turns man-eater, and Anderson recounts his experiences tracking the killer over a period of 5 years.

The Maneater of Pegepalyam

Anderson visits Pegepalyam where he makes the connection of a man-eater to be the same tiger who started to mauler in his earlier story, ‘The Mauler of Rajnagara’ (published in his previous book ‘ Man Eaters and Jungle Killers’) . Anderson again fails to kill the man-eater, though the tale concludes in his fourth book ‘ The Call of the Man Eater ‘ (in the story, ‘From Mauler to Man-Eater’).

External links

  • The Black Panther of Sivanipalli and Other Adventures of the Indian Jungle on Internet Archive

References

  1. Jump up^ Anderson, Kenneth (1959). The Black Panther of Sivanipalli and Other Adventures of the Indian Jungle . George Allen & Unwin. p. 8.